ETRUSCO-CORINTHIAN POTTERY (CERAMICA ETRUSCOCORINZIA)
   A local imitation of Corinthian pottery, made from the late seventh to the mid-sixth century BC, concentrated on the southern coastal cities (Caere, Veii, and Vulci). This pottery style is linked by some to the figure of Demaratus. The forms employed include various forms of jug (olpai, oinochoe) and unguent containers (aryballoi and alabastra) as well as amphorae and kraters. The pottery was also traded outside Etruria as far as Berezan and Odessa on the Black Sea, Amathus on Cyprus, Megara Hyblaea on Sicily, Carthage in North Africa, Tharros on Sardinia, Cap d’Antibes and Saint Blaise in southern France, and Ampurias in northeast Spain.

Historical Dictionary of the Etruscans. .

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